I am actually crying

Jul. 28th, 2017 04:39 am
giandujakiss: (ginsburg)
[personal profile] giandujakiss
with how relieved I am about the healthcare vote. Not just because it was terrible policy - though there is that - but because of the horrific, undemocratic way the GOP was trying to force it through. Ezra Klein summarized it best but I felt like the American political system was disintegrating before my eyes.

It may be on its last gasps, but thank god it's not quite dead yet.

Daily Happiness

Jul. 28th, 2017 01:25 am
torachan: nepeta from homestuck (nepeta)
[personal profile] torachan
1. I slept like ten hours and was only interrupted by cats a little bit.

2. Had a nice day off. Got a lot of translation stuff done.

3. I just found out this iOS game I really love, Oceanhorn, is out for the Switch! I've kind of been wanting to play it again, and the Switch controls can't help but be better than the touchscreen ones, so I'm pretty excited about that.

4. Just checked Facebook one last time before bed and saw that the ACA repeal bill didn't pass, thank fuck.

5. Carla managed to snap a shot of Chloe yawning. So cute!

umadoshi: (fangirl (bisty_icons))
[personal profile] umadoshi
[dreamwidth.org profile] wildpear was over last night, and among other things, we started talking about how it'd been ages since we watched anything together. We keep meaning to do that regularly during our hangouts, but ultimately The X-Files wasn't working for her--it's so very much of its time, although she's glad to have much more context for it now, because of course it's also powerfully influential--and we haven't really started in on anything else, other than the time I showed her an ep. of Princess Jellyfish.

We talked a bit about things we've been watching and meaning to watch individually: me wanting to watch Black Sails, her starting in on season 2 of Switched at Birth (which meant I got to tell her that Allison Scagliotti guest-starred in a couple of episodes at some point--[dreamwidth.org profile] wildpear, if you see this, she's in season 2!) and having watched the first few episodes of Wynonna Earp). Wynonna Earp led to talking about shows that come with the "the first chunk of episodes are weak/terrible/not representative" warning, which is so common (see also: Black Sails), and between those things Stitchers came up, and then I was saying I still haven't seen the final season of The Vampire Diaries, other than the season premiere, even though--despite having wandered off from the show in early season 5 or so--I've been meaning to watch that season because Scags is in it.

I remember showing [dreamwidth.org profile] wildpear a random episode from...uh, I don't remember; maybe late season 2?...back when I was watching TVD, and I don't think she remembers anything about that, but she somehow wound up watching the very first episode at one point and (fairly) thought it was absolutely terrible...and her mentioning that led to me telling her that even though I abandoned the show, it was way better than that once you get through the first chunk of episodes, although I honestly can't imagine ever rewatching past the first couple of seasons (once it gets into the whole Originals thing, roughly).

Upshot: I read her the Wikipedia summaries for episodes 1x01-1x05, and showed her 1x06, in which Elena and Stefan have the whole "oh God, you're a vampire!!!" day of explanations and he tells her some things about Katherine. I don't know if we'll watch further; I'm game, so it depends on her. (From the summary I expected more Katherine backstory than we actually got in that episode, which is why we watched that one, but IIRC that's around when the show actually starts finding its feet.) But wow, so many of the core cast aren't in that episode at all! Jenna's not around (possibly for reasons explained in a skipped episode), and Caroline and Bonnie and Tyler aren't onscreen at all. (Caroline's mom is, though!)

...and okay, I kinda want [dreamwidth.org profile] wildpear to see some of the show so she can see Candice Accola work, because a) I wholeheartedly adore Caroline even though she doesn't remotely match the character type(s) I usually fall for, and b) Accola ("King" now, I guess?) is my fancast for Kelly Connolly in Newsflesh.

(While writing this post I got sidetracked by rewatching vidder dayln03's Caroline vid for the first time in ages, and I'm full of feelings now. I can't find the vid online to link to now, though. :/ The vidder's YouTube profile is easy to find, but that vid isn't there.)

Shortly before [dreamwidth.org profile] wildpear headed home, I wound up telling her some very random things about Game of Thrones, which she is never, ever going to watch. It came up because some of the things people were saying about the current season, at least after the season premiere and maybe second episode, have been making me vaguely want to check in with the show after bailing an episode into...season 5, I think. (Huh. Same as with TVD.) I don't miss Game of Thrones, really, but wow, some of the acting is amazing. (See: Lena Headey for Stacy Mason! I mean, speaking of Newsflesh fancasting.)

(I really ought to consolidate my "fancasting" and "dreamcast" tags here. >.<)

Weekly Reading

Jul. 27th, 2017 07:30 pm
torachan: arale from dr slump dressed in a penguin suit and smiling (arale penguin)
[personal profile] torachan
What are you currently reading?
I started as in opened the file on my phone, but did not actually read any of Hollow City, the sequel to Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children.

I am also still in progress on The History of Forgetting: Los Angeles and the Erasure of Memory, though I don't think I read any this last week at all.

What did you recently finish reading?
I finished the aforementioned Miss Peregrin's Home for Peculiar Children a few days ago. Overall I really liked it.

I also read Alison Bechdel's Are You My Mother? As opposed to Fun Home, which is a pretty straightforward memoir about her relationship with her father, this wanders a lot, with probably as much time spent talking about her time in therapy and her readings of various famous psychologists, as well as her wondering how to write this book that she's writing, as there is stuff about her interactions with her mother. But it works really well and I enjoyed it a lot.

I read the first volume of Urasawa Naoki's Billy Bat the night before last. I had been putting off reading it until it was complete, because with this sort of suspenseful story, I knew I didn't want to have to wait between releases. And then the series ended and I loaded it all on my ipad and didn't read it because I don't know why. But now I finally started and it's just as suspenseful as I knew it would be. In fact, I stayed up way too late reading the first volume because I kept telling myself I'd stop with the next chapter and then couldn't!

What do you think you'll read next?
More Billy Bat for sure. Also I definitely plan to get started on A Wrinkle in Time soon, since it is a library book and I can't let it sit forever (though at least as an older book it's four weeks instead of two; but I imagine with people wanting to read it because of the upcoming movie, copies might be more in demand than they normally would be and I can't count on being able to renew it if I don't finish before the due date).

(no subject)

Jul. 27th, 2017 04:05 pm
owlectomy: A squashed panda sewing a squashed panda (Default)
[personal profile] owlectomy
Door number one: A class in restoration ecology!

Door number two: A class in creative writing and social justice!

Door number three: Take them both and try not to fall into an overworked panic!

... I feel like not taking that social justice class is a thing I'm going to regret, though. I wonder if I can still get a friend to drop it for me.

(It's full, but I know one or two people who are thinking of dropping.)

[TV] IN WHICH I HAVE FEELINGS.

Jul. 27th, 2017 06:16 pm
kaberett: Clyde the tortoise from Elementary, crawling across a map, with a red tape cross on his back. (elementary-emergency-clyde)
[personal profile] kaberett
Feelings the first: I've just had A finish Season 1 of Korra, and I'm going to be making him watch Spirited Away before Season 2, because that sequence is frankly one of the few things I like about Season 2, so. BUT. Having very recently watched the end of Book 3 of A:tLA with him, I Noticed a Thing about the end of Season 1 that I had not, previously, and then FEELINGS. Spoilers, obviously. )



Orphan Black is also a bunch of FEELINGS, also has spoilers (up to 5.07), and also comes with a content note for Significant Gore slightly beyond what one normally expects of the show, along with all the usual "everything is horrifying but I love all of them" caveats.

Read more... )
umadoshi: (W13 - Helena focused (kleahs))
[personal profile] umadoshi
--I have an appointment with Dr. Awesome at 3, which I'm opening with because since yesterday I've been afraid of forgetting about it. (I usually try to schedule appointments for mid-morning, and usually on Mondays [Monday being the day I'm most sure of not having work in the morning when Casual Job is on], so "mid-afternoon on a Thursday" is deeply counterintuitive.) Along with the B12 shot, I need to talk to her about how badly I've been sleeping (I think the tryptophan isn't helping much anymore), medication stuff, and my specialist appointment last month. (I printed out my notes on that, most of which are seething.)


--One of these days I'm going to have to cave and either look into a new music player or start listening to music on my phone. I've been resistant to the latter for fear of draining the phone battery too quickly, but so many people use their smartphones for music that it must not be as big an issue as I fear; also, I formed that fear back when I had a different phone with much less battery life. (And now I have a...power bank? Portable charger? Whatever they're called...that I picked up last summer when I was briefly playing Pokemon Go. *still annoyed about the game's obnoxious decision to not work for anyone using a rooted/unlocked phone*)


--Another "one of these days" things...I really need to start trying to reconstruct my AMV collection at some point, but it's exhausting to think about. :/


--Last night I wrote about 1100 words, which is more than I'd managed since early June, during [dreamwidth.org profile] nanodownunder. I was up too late doing it, and I don't care. Words! (Words that I'll probably blush over when I get a draft and send it to [dreamwidth.org profile] wildpear...and how long has it been since that was a thought? I've generally gotten pretty blasé about smut. And then there's this.)


--[dreamwidth.org profile] rushthatspeaks has a post up about The War of the Worlds. It's well worth reading, of course, but I'm noting it because I'm laughing at myself for how I get caught on it every time I see H.G. Wells referred to by male pronouns.

Daily Happiness

Jul. 27th, 2017 12:10 am
torachan: (Default)
[personal profile] torachan
1. Today was one of those days where I was constantly running around the store doing one thing or another. It felt so hectic and I even had to be on the register for a while because someone went home sick, so I thought for sure I'd have to be there until after seven at the least, but I ended up getting everything done by six-thirty.

2. I stayed up way too late last night reading, and then Chloe was being a pest and making noise and keeping me up, so I didn't end up getting much sleep last night, but now I'm super tired and it's only midnight, so I'm going to go to bed in a few minutes and am hopeful that I'll be able to get a good night's sleep tonight. (And I can sleep in tomorrow, too.)

3. Looooooook at this sweet Molly on my desk!

The War of the Worlds, H. G. Wells

Jul. 26th, 2017 03:06 pm
rushthatspeaks: (vriska: consider your question)
[personal profile] rushthatspeaks
I haven't reviewed anything here in far, far too long, and I certainly didn't think this book would be the thing to push me into wanting to write something. However. At Readercon, I picked up the new collection of Ursula K. Le Guin essays, Words Are My Matter, of which this is not a review because I am nowhere near finishing it, and I noticed that there are three separate essays on H. G. Wells. Three! This is not unique, in the structure of the book-- there are also three separate essays on José Saramago-- but that makes more sense to me, because Saramago, you know, Nobel laureate, relatively recent death, work in an interesting position vis-à-vis speculative fiction as a genre, there are some conversations to be had there that seem very much in Le Guin's chosen critical milieu. But H. G. Wells! Hasn't everything been said already?

Then it occurred to me that I, personally, had not read any Wells since the age of eight or nine, when I'd read The Time Machine and found it pretty and confusing, and then hit The War of the Worlds and found it extremely upsetting and went away again. So I went back. The Time Machine is indeed very pretty, though far less confusing to an older person. The Island of Dr. Moreau turned out to be the most vicious piece of theological criticism I have encountered in years, and an actual novel with things like character dimensionality to boot, as well as such an obvious influence on Lovecraft that I was shocked I hadn't heard that mentioned before. And then I got to The War of the Worlds.

It turns out the reason I found it very upsetting at eight or nine was because it is very upsetting, and at that age I had no context for or capacity to handle the ways in which it is upsetting.

We all know the basic plot: Martians invade, humans are technologically overpowered and defeated, Martians eventually drop dead because of Earth's microbiota. The novel came out in 1898, after having been serialized the year before, and has been dramatized and redramatized and ripped off and remade so often and so thoroughly that it has entered the collective unconscious.

The original novel, however, is notable in intellectual history not just for the archetype of the merciless and advanced alien invaders, but because it is an ice-cold prevision of the nightmares of the twentieth century. The phrase 'concentration camp' had already been coined, c. late 1860s by the Spanish in Cuba, though it would not become widely known by the English-speaking public until the Boer War, which Wells' novel just predates; that phrase is the only part of the vocabulary of future war to which Wells could have had access, and the phrase does not appear in the novel. Here are some of the concepts that do, without, as yet, any names: Genocide. Total war. Gas attack. Blitzkrieg. Extermination camp. Shellshock/PTSD. (Also, on a slightly different note, airplane.)

Wells' vision of war was ruthless, efficiently technological, distanced from the reader of the time only by the fact that the perpetrators were incomprehensible aliens. But he does not let you rely on the comforting myth that it would take an alien to perpetrate these atrocities, as perhaps the book's worst scene, in terms of sheer grueling terror and pain, is the sequence in which six million people attempt to evacuate London on no notice, with no overall organization, no plans, and the train as the most modern form of transportation. The Martians are miles away from that, literally. The only thing Wells spares you is the actual numbers of the death toll... but you can get an informed idea.

And, just in case you happen to believe that people (as opposed to aliens) are too good at heart for this sort of warfare, this novel is also a savage theological takedown*, in which the idea of humanity as the center of a cosmos created by a benevolent God is repeatedly stomped on by the sheer plausibility of the nightmare, the cold hard logistics of enemy approach + insanely destructive new bombing technology = frantic evacuation and a military rout. The priests and churchmen in War of the Worlds generally go insane**; their philosophical framework has left them ill-equipped to handle the new reality. Wells is displaying humanity as a species of animal, no more nor less privileged existentially than other sorts of animal, who may be treated by a sufficiently technological other animal in the way that humans often treat ants. He explicitly uses ants as the comparison.

This is where I noticed something fascinating. War of the Worlds has the most peculiar version of protagonist-centered morality that I have ever encountered: only the protagonist and his nearest and dearest are allowed to perform moral actions that are not shown in aggregate.

Everyone else either does good as a faceless mass, or neutral-to-evil at close proximity. The military, as a force, is allowed to act against the Martians, which is seen by definition as moral, but they are at a distance from the novel's viewpoint such that they don't emerge as people while they are fighting-- we meet an occasional refugee from a destroyed division, but we don't see people giving orders, taking orders, firing weapons. When the ramship Thunder Child attacks two Martians at close range in order to save shipping in the Channel evacuation-- a sequence distressingly like Dunkirk, only in the opposite direction and sixty years early-- it's one of the few acts of heroism and selflessness in the novel that actually works, and it's the ship personified who takes the action. Here's the middle of the fight:

"She was alive still; the steering gear, it seems, was intact and her engines working. She headed straight for a second Martian, and was within a hundred yards of him when the Heat-Ray came to bear. Then with a violent thud, a blinding flash, her decks, her funnels, leaped upward. The Martian staggered with the violence of her explosion, and in another moment the flaming wreckage, still driving forward with the impetus of its pace, had struck him and crumpled him up like a thing of cardboard."***

Notice how there are no humans, individual or otherwise, even mentioned here. And this is the high point of the book as far as moral action taken, a direct self-sacrifice for the benefit of others. Individual people range from the curate who hears the narrator calling for water "for hours" and doesn't bring him any to the men whom the narrator's brother finds in the process of robbing two ladies and has to fight off at gunpoint. Even most mob action is inimical, including things like the looting of shops and the literal trampling underfoot of the weak.

The narrator and his brother, however, mostly behave as one would hope to behave in a catastrophe. They are constantly picking up strays, helping total strangers pack to evacuate, fighting off muggers, attempting to assist the trampled, sharing their provisions with others, etc.. They are the only people in the book who do this sort of thing-- every other individual (except a couple of the strays, who are there to be rescued and get in the way) is out for themselves and can, at very best, be bought with cash on the barrel at a high price.

Now, it's not that the narrator and his brother are saints. They're fully developed, three-dimensional, relatively decent people. The brother participates in the looting of a bike shop, refuses water to a dying man for fear of putting his own people in danger, and fails to rescue anyone from the relentless trample. The narrator may well kill a man to save his own life, and certainly aids and abets the murder if he does not strike the final blow (it's impossible to find out exactly when the man dies or what specifically killed him).

The odd thing is that nobody else has any of their virtues. No one else is picking up strays; no one who isn't under military orders to do it is knocking on doors to begin the evacuation; no one is giving away food and water; no one except the military is attempting to place themselves between those they love and danger. In short, there is none of the kind of everyday, tiny, sometimes futile heroism that the twentieth century has shown us is almost impossible to beat out of humans entirely.

Now, I think this is intentional, as part of Wells's argument: the Martians have broken the human social order as if it were an anthill, and none of the ants has any idea what to do anymore. It's part of the demystification of humanity's place in the cosmos and the insistence on our nature as intelligent animals.

However, I think it skews the thought experiment in two ways: firstly, the narrator (and the only other POV character, the brother) have to be decent enough that we as readers are willing to read a book from their perspectives, and in 1898 that was harder than it is now. "Probably murdered somebody who wasn't a villain or an enemy combatant, and is never punished for it in any way except by vague remorse" is a pretty radical stance for a first-person narrator in an English novel of that period, and Wells has to talk us round into considering this a sympathetic or at least justifiable stance by having the narrator be in most other ways a flat-out hero. I don't think this does too much damage to his argument, as the resemblance of the narrator to other hero-types of the period makes Wells's more radical premises easier to communicate than they would otherwise be. It's not the presence of altruism in the narrator that is the major way the experiment is skewed.

It's the absence of altruism in others, as shown by the work of Rebecca Solnit, the memoirs of Primo Levi, the oral histories of the camp survivors of several cultures: one reason The War of the Worlds is so very upsetting is that its events are more unmitigatedly depressing than the same circumstances would be in real life. One of the wisest men of the twentieth century, Fred Rogers, said that in tough situations you should look for the helpers (and somewhere elsenet I saw the corollary, which I think Mr. Rogers considered implicit but which could use unpacking anyway, that if you cannot find them, the helpers had better be you). In The War of the Worlds there are no helpers at all, except what little the narrator and his brother can manage. We have actual science now about the way people form communities in catastrophe; we have innumerable anecdotes from the worst places and times in the world about those who in small ways, quietly, do what they can for others with what they have. It's not that Wells was wrong about us being animals, about trying to knock us off the pedestal that insists that everything was made for humanity and we are the only important beings. It's that while we are a social animal, we are a social animal on the micro-level as well as on the macro, and we have now seen that the micro-level does not have to be limited to immediate biological family, because the bonds of catastrophe can cause, and in fact seem to produce, some amount, tiny though it may be, of genuinely altruistic behavior.

When I happened to say to [personal profile] nineweaving that I was in the middle of a Wells re/read, she promptly replied with a couplet from a comic verse she had memorized as a child: "H. G. Wells / Creates new hells."

Which is true. His Martian invasion, the twentieth century through a glass darkly, is right up there on the list of the most nihilistic things I've ever read, not because of the Martians, but because none of the humans are outright villains. Some of them are insane, and some are annoying, and many are behaving in ways unconducive to long-term survival, and all of them are terrified; but you believe in them not only as individuals but as a plausible set of people for the narrator to run into in the middle of a war. It's only after thinking about it for quite a while afterwards that I noticed how neatly Wells had removed the capacity for altruism from his secondary characters. The Martians are frightening and cool and interesting (and clearly described as being drawn by H. R. Giger, which has not made it into any of the adaptations I've seen), but I think one reason this particular nightmare has lasted so long and clung so thoroughly in the back of our heads is that it would take recreating these terrible catastrophes in almost every particular to prove him wrong about the essentials of human nature and the ways people would behave in these circumstances. That's part of the book's appalling genius.

The thing is, though-- we did.

And he is.



* albeit not as much of one as Moreau, which is saying something

** that classical nineteenth-century insanity in which they rant and rave and chew the furniture, i.e. nothing you can find in the DSM, and therefore I just use 'insane' as I am not sure there is a less aggravating descriptor for this particular literary trope

*** Via Project Gutenberg's HTML copy
laceblade: Toby, Josh, and Donna of The West Wing, talking intensely (WW: 20 Hours in America)
[personal profile] laceblade
I know some people have weird squicks about RPF. Before I get into it, I just want to say that I listened to the podcasts I described below for months while having NO IDEA there was fic. Then [twitter.com profile] aileenwithan_a told me there was fic at WisCon, and I screamed at The Bar.

But it's all to say, you can enjoy the podcasts and most of this post on their own merits, and only seek out the fic if you choose to do so.
I've linked to fic under a locked post. That's also my plan going forward. I've seen the Glee cast have to put up with so much weird shit from tinhatter fans, :(

ANYWAY.
For months now, I've been listening to Pod Save America on a regular basis. During the 2016 election campaign season, it was a video semi-regular thing where Jon Favreau, Tommy Vietor, and Jon Lovett - former Obama White House staffers all - shot the shit about the campaign. They were very adamant that Hillary Clinton would win and that anyone who said otherwise were "bedwetters."

They were as shocked as the rest of us when Trump actually fucking won.
They stopped using The Ringer's resources and decided to create their own media empire. In honor of Trump, they named it Crooked Media. They now do ads on their shows and are trying to make money. (They also critique the ad copy WHILE READING IT ON THE AIR because Favreau/Lovett are both writers and cannot help themselves. Endlessly hilarious.)
You may have seen "Friend of the Pod" or "Repeal and go f$%& yourself" t-shirts - those originated with these guys.
Every Monday, Pod Save America releases an episode with Tommy, Favreau, and Lovett talking about politics and usually having a guest in the second half. Recently, they had Al Franken on. Every Thursday, Pod Save America releases a second episode of the week, with Favreau shooting the shit with Dan Pfeiffer, also a former Obama staffer/political strategist who's a few years older than these young bucks.

Tommy started his own weekly show called Pod Save the World. As Obama's former National Security Council spokesperson, Tommy will interview people like diplomats and other experts on international issues, usually trying to make it topical to things like North Korea, etc. He did invite Glenn Greenwald on his show after getting into it with him on Twitter, and it was actually one of the best episodes Tommy's done so far. I also really enjoyed his episode with Senator Tim Kaine about presidential war powers.

[twitter.com profile] deray got his own show, Pod Save the People, after appearing as a guest and having a great rapport with the trio. (I like listening to this but it's SO LONG I have only made it to the end of one of these shows ONCE lol.
Ana Marie Cox also got her own show called, "With Friends Like These," which is meant to address like, the red/blue cultural differences, basically. She's passionately liberal; members of her family are not. How do we as society function/etc.?

And finally, Lovett got his own weekly show called Lovett or Leave It, on which he basically does political standup with a rotating panel of guests made with a lot of his celebrity contacts in Hollywood. (Last week's included Sarah Silverman.) He has some semi-regular segments, such as his own Rant Wheel, because this man can literally rant on any topic.

I think the ratings for Pod Save America especially must be pretty high because they've been getting a lot of blockbuster guests lately - Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, Tim Kaine, Al Franken, Chris Murphy, Susan Rice, and some others. Occasionally they'll do a live show in Los Angeles or elsewhere.

They do a lot of work with Ben Winkler to coordinator with Indivisble, and encourage activism on the part of their listeners. A lot of structure for people doing calls/resistance recesses/other stuff stems in part from them.

Some people have compared it to like conservative talk radio, but I think they're a little more objective than that (although I also could be biased). For example on Monday's show they basically ripped apart the Democrats' newly-unveiled "policy plan" that has jackshit holding it together.

Anyway, between this and twitter [where I do admittedly follow a metric fuck-ton of journalists], this is almost exclusively how I consume news lately.
It makes me laugh, every single episode, which is something we all need lately IMO.



I have long been interested in Jon Favreau because I find him incredibly attractive and because he had what was basically my dream job. Obama's campaign came at a weird time for me. The campus Obama campaign leader my age was a kid who'd gone to some smart kids week-long thing in Washington, D.C. the summer after we graduated high school [my friend Chad came too]. We were told by the real-life Joshua Lyman (under W) to get involved with a campaign, any campaign.
I took this literally and was an unpaid intern for Mark Green, first in his U.S. district office and then as a gubernatorial candidate. After that, when I graduated, no Democrats would hire me. The woman running the Democratic Party of Wisconsin (DPW) at the time ran into a friend of mine [fellow page] on the street and told her it was because of my Republican experience. I couldn't even become an unpaid intern for a STATE SENATOR who was a Democrat because of it. (I became bitter and took a job on campus and am now at my second job on campus WHICH I LOVE but sometimes feel really bitter about what might have been.)
ANYWAY. This other KID was had Obama THANK HIM BY NAME and CLAP HIM ON THE SHOULDER when he did a campaign event at the Kohl Center on campus. I was so jealous. My jealousy of Jon Favreau and his youth was like 80x that.

Anyway, that was my hook into following Favreau on twitter and then jumping into these podcasts.

Jon Lovett is gay; Jon Favreau and Tommy Vietor are ostensibly straight [Favreau just got married]. However, Lovett frequently complains about having to appear on tv with the two of them because of how hot they are. He has also referred to them as "bromosexuals."
On Chelsea Handler's show last week, they were talking about how much time the three of them spend together. "Sounds super gay," Chelsea says.
"Super gay," Favs agrees.
"NOT NEARLY GAY ENOUGH!" says Lovett.
Because of comments like these, and their chemistry and obvious affection for one another, we have ended up with: a fandom.

Jon Favreau and his wife Emily have a dog named Leo.
Jon Lovett owns a dog named Pundit (because that's how he feels about pundits) who is Leo's sibling.

Also bonus: Lovett and Tommy lived together when they lived in DC while working at the White House.

Here's a link to an actual transcript of part of an ad they did on Pod Save America's Monday episode this week for Sonos, a speaker company. [Link goes to tumblr, no images in post.] And here is the followup in the form of Facebook comments, where Lovett upholds Pundit's honor and accuses Leo of being a werewolf.

Here's a link to a tumblr post that has an embedded image of an Instagram post, plus screencapped comments from it. Tommy Vietor and Jon Favreau sitting side-by-side looking at their laptops, doing a Q&A. This was when they campaigned about health care in DC right after Favreau's wedding. In the comments, someone cheekily says they look like a before/after advertisement for self-tanner, and Tommy (the very pale one) says, "That is...so accurate." (They are all very self-deprecating.)

This is a gifset on tumblr of Lovett introducing Tommy Vietor on his Lovett or Leave It podcast. [It's a podcast but they do it in front of a live audience bc it's comedy.] It's hilarious because it's a perfect example of how Lovett talks, and because Tommy can't stop laughing even though Lovett is roasting him.
"Honestly, Tommy looks like a boat shoe became a person."
"He's the WASPiest thing I've ever seen. They based...they based many of the characters of the Sound of Music on his face."

Here's a tumblr gifset mostly of Tommy and Lovett interacting with one another.

Lovett is almost always angry/ranting but occasionally he gets really serious and is very eloquent when he does so. Almost like...underneath his bluster, he's an idealistic kid who writes really well and worked for Obama :*) Example!

SO YEAH. Anyway.....me, the person who never writes fic, have my first 5.3k fic in this fandom out with like 5 ppl [IF ANYONE ELSE WANTS TO BETA PLS LMK I NEED FEEDBACK.]
umadoshi: (W13 - Claudia open mic (vampire_sessah))
[personal profile] umadoshi
The Toast makes a one-day-only return appearance today! "Link Roundup!"

Yesterday [dreamwidth.org profile] bluemeridian posted a batch of MCU and Wonder Woman recs.

"‘Wrath of Khan’ Returning to Theaters for 35th Anniversary".

"Orbit Turns 10: Take a Look at a Decade of Milestones". [The B&N Sci-Fi and Fantasy Blog]

Via [dreamwidth.org profile] misbegotten, the Cincinnati Zoo has successfully reunited Fiona-the-hop with both of her parents. Adorable hippo pictures ahoy!

From 2014, but via Twitter today: "BitchTapes: American Protest Music". [Bitch Media]

"The Fourth Messenger at the 2017 New York Musical Festival". [ViennaTeng.com] (Includes purchase links for the soundtrack and script.) [ETA: Refers to a concluded run, not an upcoming one.]

On Atlas Obscura:

--"NASA Just Released Hundreds of Historic Space and Aviation Videos".

--"These Endangered Pygmy Rabbits Survived a Wildfire by Heading Underground".

--"Why It Took Scientists So Long to Figure Out Where Babies Come From: Human conception was still basically a total mystery until as recently as 1875".

--"The Odor ‘Wheel’ Decoding the Smell of Old Books".

--"The Dormouse-Fattening Jars of Ancient Rome".

--"People in 1920s Berlin Nightclubs Flirted via Pneumatic Tubes".

--"Found: Never-Developed Photos of Mount St. Helens Erupting".

--"These Maps Reveal the Hidden Structures of ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ Books".



On Mental Floss:

--"The Golden Girls Are Starring in Their Own Version of Clue".

--"This Illustrated Periodic Table Shows How We Regularly Interact With Each Element".

Daily Happiness

Jul. 26th, 2017 02:04 am
torachan: nepeta from homestuck (nepeta)
[personal profile] torachan
1. I posted the final chapter of Tera Girl! I feel really good about getting that finished.

2. It was busy at work today and two people called out sick, but we had enough other people to cover and I didn't end up needing to stay as long as I thought I might (in fact, I got out of there pretty much on time).

3. We started watching Crazy Ex-Girlfriend tonight. There's definitely a lot of cringey embarrassing situations, which are kind of hard to watch, but overall I'm enjoying it.

4. We went to DK's for doughnuts tonight. They had a new mango doughnut that was super tasty (though it's one of their pricey ones, so I doubt I'll get it again).

5. Jasper feet!

Scanlations: Tera Girl ch. 6

Jul. 25th, 2017 10:21 pm
torachan: a drawing of a girl holding up buddhist beads as if in prayer (tera girl)
[personal profile] torachan
This is it, guys, the final chapter of Tera Girl! The zip also includes the bonus chapter Tera Kids, plus eight pages of gag comics and author talk from the end of the volume. If you are only interested in the Tera Girl story, then this zip file completes it. If you are also interested in the unrelated one-shot MKK Girl that was also included in the volume, then keep your eyes peeled, as I will be posting it sometime it the next couple months.



Title: Tera Girl
Original Title: 寺ガール (Tera Girl)
Author: Mizusawa Megumi
Publisher: Ribon Mascot Comics Cookie
Genre: Shoujo
Status in Japan: 3 volumes, complete
Scanlator: Megchan's Scanlations feat. Migeru
Scanlation Status: Ongoing
More Info: Baka Updates

Summary: When your father is a Buddhist priest and your home is a temple, life can be complicated. For Satoru, Hikari, and Ogami, the thought of who will inherit the temple and take over when their father gets old is always in the back of their minds, especially when it comes to matters of the heart. Because Hikari loves the temple so much, it's been all but decided that when she grows up, she'll marry someone who can take over from her father, but when she falls for someone completely unsuitable, all three sisters find themselves re-examining their assumptions.

Chapter summary: Hika is torn between her loyalty to the temple and her feelings for Okura-kun. Also includes a bonus chapter about Hika and her sisters when they were kids.



Chapter 6: Feast of Lanterns

(no subject)

Jul. 25th, 2017 09:30 pm
skygiants: Anthy from Revolutionary Girl Utena holding a red rose (i'm the witch)
[personal profile] skygiants
[personal profile] jothra went to a library sale last week and asked if I had any requests: "Weird 70s Gothics? Trixie, Belden?"

"WEIRD 70S GOTHICS PLEASE," I said, and Jo duly carried out her commission so well that I don't know if anybody's ever going to top it:



Portrait in Jig-Saw is apparently so obscure it doesn't even have a Goodreads page, which, having read it, I can honestly now say is kind of a shame.

Our Heroine's name is Alixander David Somerlaid MacDonald (I KNOW), otherwise known as Alisdair; she is a Strictly Sheltered Heiress who has been raised in a Freezing Castle in Complete Isolation and Solitude with only occasional visits from her father until she comes of age on her 21st birthday.

...for the record, the year is 1973.

My legit favorite part about these spoilers is that the entire plot relies on an alternate universe where the world's most famous postmodern novelist is a Thai princess, I want to live in THAT universe! )

The academic tic, then, is puzzling

Jul. 25th, 2017 05:12 pm
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k

I've just finished an anthology written by folks who work in higher education. I've noticed an ubiquitous and peculiar stylistic fillip that didn't appear in my textbooks when I was in college.

It appears most often as the bridging sentence between paragraphs, in the form:

[Things concluded & proven] comma then comma [introduce this new concept/approach/fact]

Where did this come from? Does this "comma then comma" replace an earlier rhetorical move I didn't notice?

How can I make it go away?

giandujakiss: (Default)
[personal profile] giandujakiss
Now is the time to call your Senators. Yes, certain GOP senators are particularly critical, but honestly, call yours no matter who you are or where you live. This is about protecting Medicaid, the general healthcare infrastructure in this country, and also denying Trump a win so that GOP feels more compelled to boot him out. On every level, GOP attempts to repeal ACA must be fought.

And yes, even if you called before - call again.

Daily Happiness

Jul. 25th, 2017 01:33 am
torachan: maru the cat giving the side eye (maru side eye)
[personal profile] torachan
1. I had a good day off today. Got a chapter of You Will Hear the Voice of the Dead finished, and almost finished a chapter of Fulldrum. Did some housework, ran some errands. Got a lot of reading done.

2. I finally got the last memory in Breath of the Wild. Also finished up one of the sidequests I had hanging about (the Stalhorse one), and decided to search for the DLC treasures. So far I got the Twilight Princess mask and Majora's mask. (Both of them, as well as Misko's journal, which tells you the locations of the treasurers, were all in areas I'd never explored before, too.) Oh, and I picked up the reward for finding all 120 shrines.

3. When we were out running errands, I stopped at See's Candy and got some stuff that turned out to be almost exactly the amount left on the gift card my mom got me for my birthday. So I got a big bag of chocolates and only had to pay 28 cents. :D

4. Got soooo many great kitty pics today. I really love this one of Chloe looking regal.

umadoshi: (StarCraft - Zerg symbol)
[personal profile] umadoshi
--My sleep has continued to be all over the place. Last night I managed to get to bed around 1 AM or so (IIRC) and didn't get up until 11:30 today; the night before, I was in bed by 1:15 so I could get up at a reasonable hour and [dreamwidth.org profile] scruloose, [dreamwidth.org profile] ginny_t, Kas, and I could go raspberry picking, and I managed, at a generous estimate, two hours of sleep. FUN.


--I had these notions of finishing a fic for this round of [dreamwidth.org profile] smallfandomfest, but it wraps up at the end of this month, so...ha ha ha no. ^^; But hey, I got it started and made some actual progress during [dreamwidth.org profile] nanodownunder, and unfilled [dreamwidth.org profile] smallfandomfest prompts remain available for claiming past the round when they're prompted, so it's not like I won't have another chance. I just liked the idea of doing it now.


--I haven't taken pictures yet, but when we were out watering the garden a couple of days ago, there were the beginnings of blossoms on one of the two clematis plants!


--Amidst all the political awfulness, personal stuff, cute gifs, and book-blogger chat, my Twitter feed has been full of people being gleeful about "Dream Daddy: A Dad Dating Simulator"--enough so that I briefly pretended I don't have something like 100 unplayed games and can't remember the last time I played anything and went to check it out. I was saved by an impulse buy by the fact that the game's currently Windows- and Mac-only; I do still have a Windows partition for games, but realistically, I also can't remember the last time I booted into it for anything but StarCraft. (And that wasn't terribly recently. I did buy at least the first of the SCII Nova mission packs, but I don't remember how far I got.) (Separate parenthetical: I've preordered the remastered original StarCraft, so for that, booting into Windows will undoubtedly happen. Unless it magically runs under WINE.)


--I need to keep reminding myself that Rogue One is on Netflix until I finally watch it (having literally slept through most of it in the theatre, which was not the movie's fault!). I should also rewatch TFA sometime in the next few months.


--It turns out Black Sails is shorter than I'd been thinking in two ways: I'd somehow had the impression it's five seasons, not four, and I also hadn't realized the seasons are so short (eight to ten episodes each, I think?). All of a sudden bumping it up to basically the top of my to-watch list (which seems to be a good plan, judging from how many people I know are in love with the show) is a way less daunting prospect.

Linkspam: fannish/geeky, misc.

Jul. 24th, 2017 11:19 pm
umadoshi: (lilacs 01)
[personal profile] umadoshi
Fannish/Geeky Things

Via [dreamwidth.org profile] sgamadison, an update on Stargate Origins: be aware that the new digital episodes are only going to be ten minutes each.

"A Woman, Explaining Things". [Sarah Gailey on the casting of the thirteenth Doctor]

"Towards a Definition of “Fanfiction”: 3,564 people took our survey. Here’s what we learned". [Fansplaining]

"Does God exist in the Marvel Universe?" [Salon]

"Akiko Higashimura's Princess Jellyfish Manga Ends on August 25". [ANN]


Miscellaneous

"Radical Cartography" is...hard for me to describe. Very cool things with maps...and stuff...?

"All of my work on the “Irish slaves” meme (2015–’16)". In case you ever need to debunk the "but the Irish were slaves too!" crap that some flavors of racists like to whip out.

"Gratitude for Invisible Systems: One way to improve democracy is for more people to appreciate its complex technological underpinnings".

"My Father Spent 30 Years In Prison. Now He's Out". This is lovely and heartbreaking.

"Updated Syllabus for Journalism 101". [McSweeney's]

"This Is How Tough It Can Actually Be To Follow High School Prom Dress Codes". [Buzzfeed]

Via [dreamwidth.org profile] bell, "When Your Teacher Keeps Saying You Can’t Draw Cats, But Your Paintings Are Photorealistic".

"Make a Magical Carpet Cat Hammock With an Old Towel".

"This Guy Spent A Year Exploring The Subculture Of Competitive Punning".

"How to Fall Down". [Lifehacker]

"Sapphic Stories || Around the world". "Sapphic Stories – Around the world does not intend to be a rec list that is ultimate and finalized, but just the beginning of a search for more pluralized stories. There are many other stories out there that we need to look for. Still, I believe that this post could be a nice start so that people can recognize these stories set in the places they grew up in or to know more about what it means to be sapphic in other places. This list contains F/F fiction books, books that have at least one women who feel romantic/sexual attraction to women, short stories, anthologies, and nonfiction about how it is to be LGBT+ in some places of the world."

"tim walker photographs all black cast for alice in wonderland themed pirelli calendar".

Via [dreamwidth.org profile] dine, "Superb Cut Paper Artworks by Pippa Dyrlaga".

Profile

laceblade: Kumiko and Reina from Hibike! Euphonium anime, Reina holding Kumiko's face w/one hand, faces close enough to almost touch. (Default)
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